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Find the most beautiful fall foliage running trails in northern New England with help from Great Runs

[fa icon="calendar"] Sep 28, 2017 12:43:24 PM / by Mary Lhowe

Mary Lhowe

Our friends at Great Runs sent a note describing their favorite foliage-viewing running trails in northern New England. We here at VisitNewEngland.com are couch-loving people, but you running people: have at it! Fill your lungs with autumn air and gaze at everything around you!

 (Of course, we always encourage you to enjoy and use the state parks of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire,Rhode Island, and Vermont.)

Great Runs recommends:

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New Hampshire -- Franconia Notch State Park Recreation Path in Franconia

The people of the Granite State love their notches (mountain passes)! This magnificent state park has a paved trail is 9 miles, traveling from Flume Gorge in the south to Skookumchuck and Route 3 in the north, with an 800-foot elevation gain. Views along the way make a fresh runner’s high. Map

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Vermont – Shelburne Farms in Shelburne

A farm just a little south of the lakeside city of Burlington is a National Historic Landmark with gorgeous views of Lake Champlain. Runners can beat their feet on more than 10 miles of walking trails that are open year-round, weather permitting. [Extra: the Farm hosts lots of fun educational and food events.] Map.

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Maine -- Acadia National Park Carriage Roads in Bar Harbor

As the name promises, these roads were built for carriages of the early 19th century. The 45 miles of roads are well-groomed and used by lots of people, including bicyclists. Ease to find, within this magnificent national park. Watch for the lovely arch bridges and snap a photo. Map

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Massachusetts -- Battle Road Trail (Lexington to Concord)

The Minuteman Trail – also called the Minuteman Bikeway and used by cyclists -- is a 5-mile gravel trail following Paul Revere general direction, from Lexington to Concord. You can almost feel the presents of history all around you. Enjoy views of woods, historic sites, fields and bit of urban life. Trail map.

Look for more in a posting tomorrow, September 29!

Mary Lhowe

Written by Mary Lhowe